Mennonite Church USA

Mennonite Church USA

718 Main St.
Newton, KS 67114
United States

Attesting Officer
Shelley Buller
Executive Assistant


Media Contact
Janie Beck Kreider

38.0506371, -97.3446731


Mennonite Church USA, with 70,000 members, is one of several denominations that traces their beginnings to the Protestant Reformation in the early 1500s. Mennonites hold common core beliefs with other Christian denominations, but they live out God's call in some ways that make them distinct. Mennonites believe in giving ultimate loyalty to God rather than to the nations in which they live. They believe that Jesus revealed a way for people to live peacefully and nonviolently, and they seek to be peacemakers in everyday life.
Mennonite church USA is committed to sharing its faith and passion for Jesus with others and is open to anyone who confesses Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior and wants to live as Jesus taught.
The vision statement of Mennonite Church USA reads, "God calls us to be followers of Jesus Christ and, by the power of the Holy Spirit, to grow as communities of grace, joy, and peace, so that God's healing and hope flow through us to the world." Mennonite Church USA -- its congregations, area conferences, Executive Board, ministry offices and churchwide agencies -- focus on seven priorities as it seeks to nurture missional congregations that join in God's activity in the world:
1. Christian formation. This priority reflects the centrality of Jesus Christ in the church. Missional Mennonite congregations call people to Christian commitment, disciple them in the way of Christ, teach them to embrace the Scriptures, help them develop Christian identity from an Anabaptist/Mennonite perspective, and cultivate their vocational calling.
2. Christian community. This priority reflects the communal, organic nature of the body of Christ. Missional congregations worship together, extend hospitality, practice scriptural discernment, cultivate Christ-centered unity, and learn to agree and disagree in love.
3. Holistic Christian witness. This priority reflects the winsome nature of the church’s witness. Missional churches share the good news of Jesus Christ in word and deed, birthing new communities of faith. They reflect God’s coming reign by striving for peace and justice.
4. Stewardship. This priority reflects our commitment to surrender all that we have for the sake of God’s reign. Missional churches cultivate whole-life stewardship, care for creation, and practice mutual aid.
5. Leadership development. This priority reflects our commitment to develop leaders at all levels of the church. Missional churches help all of their members reach their potential as they follow God’s call.
6. Undoing racism and advancing intercultural transformation. This priority reflects our intent to dismantle individual and systemic racism in our church, develop intercultural competence, heal racial divisions, and value all the gifts of God’s diverse people.
7. Church-to-church relationships. This priority reflects our desire to give and receive gifts in the broader body of Christ, working toward Christian unity as a witness to the world. We cultivate a particularly close relationship with Mennonite Church Canada since we share a common history, confession of faith, and ministerial polity, and many joint ministry ventures.
Mennonite Church USA lists as its strengths a high level of integrity recognized in both society and the religious community; high church attendance (90% of members attend church regularly); expanded global awareness through exposure to other world cultures; strong commitment to nonviolence and use of conflict resolution skills; above average giving to the work of the church; a natural communitarian impulse demonstrated by an emphasis on congregational relationships and mutual accountabilities; strong support of volunteer efforts, relief and service activities; and a holistic theology that holds word and deed together.


Full Communicants Average Attendance Other Members Total Inclusive Members Total Churches Membership Calculation Method
2009
104,684
0
0
104,684
920
2008
106,172
0
0
106,172
0
2006
109,174
0
0
109,174
935
2002
112,688
94,547
0
112,688
964
1999
92,002
73,373
0
92,002
935
1998
92,161
0
0
92,161
926
1996
90,959
0
0
90,959
1,004
1995
90,812
0
0
90,812
986
1994
95,591
0
0
95,591
1,099
1993
95,634
0
0
95,634
1,058
1992
99,446
0
0
99,446
1,056
1990
92,517
0
0
92,517
1,034
1989
92,517
0
0
92,517
1,034
1988
92,682
0
0
92,682
1,023
1987
91,167
0
0
91,167
989
1985
91,167
0
0
91,167
989
1983
110,294
0
0
110,294
1,201
1982
101,501
0
0
101,501
1,179
1981
99,651
0
0
99,651
1,151
1980
99,511
0
0
99,511
1,140
1979
98,027
0
0
98,027
1,107
1978
97,142
0
0
97,142
1,081
1977
96,609
0
0
96,609
1,074
1976
96,092
0
0
96,092
1,059
1975
94,209
0
0
94,209
1,059
Serving Churches Retired Other Service to the Church Total Clergy
2009
1,503
779
0
2,831
2008
1,165
714
0
1,879
2006
1,076
908
0
1,984
2002
738
2,578
656
0
1999
0
0
0
2,967
1998
0
0
0
2,688
1996
1,525
0
0
2,817
1995
1,350
0
0
2,464
1994
1,364
0
0
2,468
1993
1,495
0
0
2,662
1992
1,637
0
0
2,784
1990
1,504
0
0
2,545
1989
1,504
0
0
2,545
1988
1,448
0
0
2,469
1987
1,562
0
0
2,399
1985
1,562
0
0
2,399
1983
2,105
0
0
2,957
1982
1,785
0
0
2,400
1981
1,820
0
0
2,523
1980
1,739
0
0
2,509
1979
1,912
0
0
2,596
1978
1,742
0
0
2,393
1977
1,905
0
0
2,578
1976
1,806
0
0
2,441
1975
1,774
0
0
2,485
Total Schools Staff Pupils Total Individuals
1999
916
0
43,719
43,719
1998
907
0
0
0
1996
1,495
0
0
139,859
1995
985
0
0
163,393
1994
1,077
0
0
136,076
1987
973
0
0
112,381
1985
973
0
0
112,381
1983
986
0
0
114,894
1982
984
0
0
115,300
1981
986
0
0
119,960
1980
1,011
0
0
122,910
1978
753
0
0
93,685
1977
750
0
0
96,681
1976
852
0
0
106,306
1975
915
0
0
112,946
1974
900
0
0
112,098
1973
985
0
0
110,130
1972
888
0
0
111,747
1971
967
0
0
110,475
1970
967
0
0
110,475
1969
864
0
0
107,120
1968
905
0
0
111,629
1967
979
0
0
125,907
1966
882
0
0
124,172
1965
856
10,482
116,115
126,597
Total Benevolences Total Financials Total Giving Local Expenses Method
1999
$26,452,444
$102,000,000
$75,796,469
1998
$25,637,872
$102,000,000
$76,087,609
1996
$27,812,549
$104,000,000
$76,669,365
1995
$26,832,240
$98,474,013
$71,641,773
1994
$24,830,192
$89,481,831
$64,651,639
1993
$27,973,380
$99,358,651
$71,385,271
1992
$28,835,719
$96,953,941
$68,118,222
1991
$28,464,199
$97,390,523
$68,926,324
1990
$28,397,083
$94,106,910
$65,709,827
1989
$27,873,241
$83,226,554
$55,353,313
1988
$27,043,900
$74,815,100
$47,771,200
1987
$25,033,600
$68,328,700
$43,295,100
1985
$25,593,500
$59,608,700
$34,015,200
1984
$16,944,094
$54,277,400
$37,333,306
1983
$17,581,878
$51,735,506
$34,153,628
1982
$17,981,274
$51,564,612
$33,583,338
1980
$16,437,738
$45,284,669
$28,846,931
1979
$15,116,762
$39,622,108
$24,505,346
1978
$14,070,757
$36,993,174
$22,922,417
1977
$12,980,502
$31,520,739
$18,540,237
1976
$12,259,924
$29,475,158
$17,215,234
1975
$11,860,385
$27,193,293
$15,332,908
1974
$9,887,051
$23,679,317
$13,792,266
1973
$6,159,740
$15,232,598
$9,072,858
1972
$7,168,664
$17,081,840
$9,913,176